Passionate Plumb

I just finished my latest painting of a plum headed parakeet. I just love these birds for their vibrant color and charming personalities. To prepare for  this particular piece, I bought a tube of magenta by Windsor and Newton to add to my paint collection, which really allowed me to get some bright color for that beautiful head.  And I could justify a shopping trip to the art store…yay!!!  I am trying to pull back some on the detailing and allow for abstract creation, and this piece was definitely a journey in the right direction for me.  Watercolor is so beautiful when it is just allowed to flow and blend and do what it does, so hopefully being a little less “demanding” of it will lead to more intriguing effects.

 

INKed

I have been fascinated and delighted by ink/watercolor works for quite some time now, so I decided to give it a shot myself.  I just love way the free flow of the watercolor lends a contrast to the precision of the pen.  I worked on a dragonfly first and was very generous with the color surrounding it.  It was a bit overwhelming I thought, so I hashed out a betta fish and was a bit more restained with the colors.  The latter is definitely much more my style, and I think the drawing has more room to stand on in that piece.

My tools of choice for this project were a Faber-Castell PITT artist pen in black (waterproof india ink), Winsor & Newton watercolor pigments and Strathmore 140 lb. watercolor paper.  A pretty easy project and so much fun.  Give it a go, and let me know what you think!

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Squeezing out Creativity

Here is my experiment on painting straight from the tube with watercolor pigments (as inspired by this post).  The left side of the paper was wet and the right side I left dry, just so I could see what the range of effects could be.  The wet side did encourage the paint to flow outwards, but there are still some very lovely textural effects which took place.  As you can see, the color saturation was also phenomenal where the paint remained concentrated.  Both sides of the paper allowed the paint to maintain texture, which is super cool, as this can allow for a myriad ways to create and express a vision.  On the dry side, as can be expected, the paint didn’t flow as much. Where I ended up dragging the tube along, a lovely textural effect emerged as the paint settled into the grooves of the watercolor paper.  A lighter touch allowed the paint to skip along, leaving a good bit of white among dry dabs of paint.  Lovely!  There are a lot of possibilities with this method, and I look forward to experimenting some more with it!

Materials used:  Strathmore 140lb. watercolor paper, Winsor & Newton watercolour pigments in Alizarin Crimson, Hookers Green and French Ultramarine.

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Paints on the dry surface.
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Paints on the wet surface.

F Is For Flamingo

What a lovely shape and colors!

Doodlewash

Flamingo Doodlewash

The hands down most suggested bird was a Flamingo for today’s doodlewash and entry into Draw A Bird Day (hosted this month by Kerfe and Nina at Method Two Madness on behalf of Laura at Create Art Everyday). I decided to try this one fast and loose and limit the palette to just three main colors. I also had precious little time to paint today, so this was really my only option.

Flamingos have rather tiny eyes, so getting an expression was a bit tough. I prefer things with larger eyes, but it was fun to play with brighter colors. Had I more time, this one would be standing in water, but I purposely cropped that bit and just focused on the bird instead. Flamingo comes from the Spanish word flamenco, “with the colour of flame”, or colloquially just meaning “cocky” which I guess you can be when you are…

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Straight From The Tube

What an impactful experiment. This has inspired me to do the same with watercolor, just to see what the results are. I am expecting a more fluid impression with a high color impact. The latter is really exciting to me, as it sometimes can be tough to get a good saturation of color with watercolor paint, since it lightens when it dries. We will see what we get!!!

Where Creativity Works

I love experimenting different ways to apply paint to a canvas! With this non-objective painting I was applying some of the paint directly from the tube. This creates an interesting impasto look to the painting and not to mention it is so much fun.

20160115_154904.jpg First approach

I was working with oil paint and began the painting with a limited color palette. Using different variations of ultramarine blue, permanent green, titanium white and flesh tint I began to play with the composition of my colors. My painting started off vertical and as I kept painting I ended up switching it to horizontal. With non-objective paintings it sometimes can help to flip the orientation of the painting to see what else it has to offer.

After I switched the orientation the painting I was able to identify which areas needed work. It’s fun to experiment with colors by putting certain ones next…

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