Images

In Black and White

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When I first began my journey with watercolor, I closely followed an artist who used a combination of colors to produce black.  She would, for instance, mix blue and brown to produce a wide array of grays and an “almost black,” which then could be used to give paintings an interesting depth of color while providing contrast.  I never remember her using white, although there were instances where masking fluid was used to allow the white of the paper to add dimension.

Hence I never added black or white to my collection of paints.  Until now!  As I have explored different artwork, I have become very intrigued with the dimension that black can add to a work and how it can make other colors become more prominent in a painting.  Alongside that is the notion that it just completes the range of colors that make up most of what we see.  Real life has lots of white and black so this lends itself to art as well;  this makes art more recognizable to us.

I look forward to creating some pieces with my new passion for white and black.  Can’t wait to share them with you!

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To Be Show Lucky

I have been hard at work on a piece for a juried show entry. I felt compelled to do a hummingbird and thought I would try my hand at using gold watercolor paint for the first time. I really love how it turned out and that the painting takes on a slightly different identity depending on the angle from which you view it! Hope this thing flies into the finals, but even if it doesn’t, it was a ton of fun to create. Have you tried something new today?

Thinking Inside the Box

This week I am very excited to focus on cubism.  Pablo Picasso was one of the founders of this movement, which placed art within the confines of geometric shapes, two dimensional space and multiple viewpoints.  Here is a lovely essay on this style, if you care to learn more!

This week, the work which is our launching point is Sylvette by Picasso.  A lovely portrait painted with lots of shapes, colors and limited detail, so that we are forced to focus on the things that are important to consider. Keeping that in mind, this week’s challenge is to:

Complete a modern portrait of something inspirational to you while paying homage to cubism.

I chose to do a painting of a female with lots of colors and shapes. The shapes in my artwork were placed to enhance  facial features and give more interest to the picture as a whole.  Also, as I was completing the work, I started thinking about how symmetry is often related to beauty.  Hence, I offset some of the facial features to see if my perception would change.  What do you think?  Is the woman in the painting beautiful still, or does the misalignment of things take away from her appeal?

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I look forward to seeing what you come up with!  If you are new to this challenge, you can visit this page for more details.  Also, don’t forget to tag your work with #whatsnextwed, so that everyone can see what you’ve done.

Special thanks to talented artist Holly Sharpe for giving me some inspiration in modernizing this piece.  You can visit her lovely work here.

 

 

Welcome to What’s Next Wednesday

20160705_221616.jpgWelcome to our opening challenge for What’s Next Wednesday!  This weekly art event, inspired by the book Steal Like an Artist, is made to challenge you creatively and help you develop your style alongside some of history’s biggest artistic geniuses.  Although that’s a mouthful, please don’t be intimidated by the scope of this adventure.  Any and all artists and creators are welcome, as are art connoisseurs, art historians, doodlers, plumbers, stay-at-home moms, and people whose names begin with the letter “j.”  Create something big or something small.  Something complex or something simple.  Just. Create.  If you haven’t visited the page for this weekly event yet, check it out here for a few more details, a cool badge you can add to your page, and some limited rules.

Alright, off we go!  This week’s challenge is as follows:

Create a likeness of the Mona Lisa, and include the reason why she is wearing such a sly smile somewhere within your artwork!

Don’t forget to tag your work with #whatsnextwed so your project is visible to other participants.  We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

Feel free to get started, or read on for my take on this challenge!

I decided to draw Mona in front of the Louvre, where she has been housed since 1797. As she has kept alive there for so many years, I can’t help but think she would smile at her caretaker if given a chance.  Also, I included the background to pay homage to Leonardo’s  use of a landscape in the original painting.  This was a new concept at the time and really changed the course of art in his area of the world. Since I like the vibrant, “drippy” approach to watercolor, that part of the painting is purely me (as influenced by several other artists who take this approach as well).  Materials used include an india ink pen, Winsor & Newton watercolor paints and Fluid hot press watercolor paper.

 

 

What’s Next?

Have you even wondered about your favorite artists and what they might have forgotten, left out, or failed to create because they lived in their particular era?   In other words, they created what they did and now….what’s next?  This is the inspiration behind our new weekly art blogging event “What’s Next Wednesday.”  Each week on, you guessed it, Wednesday, we will post a new prompt which asks you to expand on something a well known artist has already done.  The goal is for you to channel the spirit of the original artist and then add your own spin!  You can find all the details here along with a few simple rules to keep you from going all willy nilly on us.  No worries, your creativity will still be able to flow freely.

To get the thought process flowing, here is a reinterpretation of Van Gogh’s famous piece Starry Night.

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https://pixabay.com/en/landscape-scene-scenic-nature-1315124/

Perhaps this is how Van Gogh would have completed the work, had he enjoyed the use of digital equipment?  Maybe this is Starry Night over a desert instead and there was a cactus in the foreground.  In any case, the spirit of Van Gogh remains, but a new identity has been achieved.  So, dream about stars, computers and cacti tonight, and we’ll see you tomorrow for the very first installment of “What’s Next Wednesday!”

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